Fashionable activism?

Sometimes it feels like whenever something kicks off people have the urgency to go all out and share whatever they can find on the Internet without verifying if its true or not.
Some would even argue this is causing harm (Haretz recently stated that Palestinians are spreading propaganda) and not doing anyone much favors. Personally, I feel that awareness among people, who have a sense of empathy and decency, know what is going on and lets be frank here if all of this was successful we would have seen change long time ago in regards to Palestine, Syria, Myanmar, Central African Republic etc. Another sad reality that this form of activism causes is that people from other affected places will start getting upset knowing that their cause or suffering isn’t ‘worthy’ enough which then makes people compare calamities across the globe and distances the gap between people.

We can’t change the world via sharing posts regarding an area every minute or protesting once or twice a year and doing nothing for the rest of the year. If we look at Palestine, for example, we usually hear and see people’s outcry during Israeli advances into Gaza which have recently occurred in 2009, 2012 and now in 2014. What about Syria? We usually see people’s outrage when the regime decides to employ chemical weapons against civilians. How many of you knew that more than 1000 people were killed during June alone? What about the ongoing crises in Burma or must we wait until the BBC decides to showcase a 1 minute segment?

I admire the people who dedicate their lives to causes that are benefitting to humanity as they try and ensure that we don’t forget about these sufferings in our life of luxury and safety but what annoys me is when people do these acts just to jump on a bandwagon and make themselves feel at ease. I understand this helps people overcome the feeling of helplessness but there is so much more we can do. We need to establish ourselves so we can lobby this government as the Zionists have done for years because years of protests have had very little impact.

(I am not directing this to anyone in particular as I myself have been guilty of this, just something to reflect on)

Leaving a legacy

'We need to talk about methodology because a lot of time what we talk about in speeches are outcomes but outcomes don’t come without their causes. So number one as young Muslims in the West we have to talk about methodology that needs to be centrists in nature, it is extremely important to be centrist and not to be fanatical to one group or another because that fanaticism destroys us and weakens us. We have a very beautiful principal in Islam, that is if something good if its harm becomes greater then its good it should be left alone and we learn this from our Prophet. In the hadeeth related by our mother Aisha (ra) the Prophet (saw) after the conquest of Mecca he said to her that if it wasn’t that your people were new to Islam I would order that the Kabba be destroyed and rebuilt on the foundations of Abraham. Imam Nawawi says that this is an example of leaving a good that could possible lead to a greater harm.

The ultimate goal of Sharia is to bring benefit and prevent harm. Imam Al-Ghazzali said that the entire goal of Sharia is to bring everything that benefits people in this life and the hereafter. Imam Ibn Taimiyah also said that goal of sharia is to bring benefit and prevent harm, 60 years before him Nawawi and 60 years after him Ashatabi and 150 years after him Ashowkani and all of these Ulema from the earliest days until the last days have said that the entire goal of Sharia is to bring benefit and prevent harm. So if you want a mission statement for your life after being a servant of Allah is to bring benefit and prevent harm. This is why the Prophet (saw) said the best person is the one who benefits others the most.

As a legacy, we have to visualise what is going to benefit ourselves and ultimately if God blesses us to benefit others around us, because the prophet (saw) likened us to land one is a land which soaks the water. He (saw) said the example that God has sent me with is like rain that falls on land: one that soaks the water, benefits itself, has a healthy soil and creates lots of growth that benefit others. The second soaks up the water but doesn’t benefit others. The last is a rocky land that has no benefit. The first is an example of a person who benefits themselves and benefits others, the second is the one who benefits themselves only and the last is someone who doesn’t benefit from the guidance of Allah because their heart is hard. So the ultimate level is to be someone who not only benefits themselves but is able to benefit the people around them.

It is important that we do not define our legacy by particulars, and by particulars I mean our culture. I am against this indigenous divide, this is a fitnah because we are brothers and sisters. We can have our differences in our discussions but its not good for us to introduce these type of terminology into the community that could ultimately undermine its unity because even though it might seem good the harm is more. The same thing applies to calling myself Az’hari, Sufi, Salafi, whatever’e. If the goal behind that is to strengthen Islam and to help the ummah you can call yourself what you want but if the goal behind that is to undermine the unity of the Muslims and weaken our ranks as a community then ultimately the employment of those terms becomes harmful and harm is what in islam? Harm is removed. This is what the scholars have said that there are six rules related when using terms, we don’t even know what we are saying has a ruling behind it. One of the rules is that the term does not weaken the ranks of the Muslims, to divide the Muslims because that is the ultimate harm. So when I say don’t define ourselves by particulars to the point that those particulars undermine your ultimate legacy of doing good and bringing benefit and protecting people from harm.

How did this play out through history? In the 6th century in Baghdad there were a number of blind people and the Ulema met to discuss how this problem should be dealt with. They decided on a dog, the Seeing Eye dog was an invention of the Ummah you belong to. One of the main reasons why we have lost this greatness is because we have let the particulars of life (our culture, race, social class, group)
In Egypt you have these troughs on the side of the road, which was designed for dogs. This is because the people were taken care of so they started taking care of dogs because they were scared that if a dog died in Cairo of thirst it would complain to Allah about us. People would build minarets to make sure birds had proper nutrition. This was four hundred years ago.’

A famous Persian story speaks of a Shah who passed by an old man planting an olive tree, which takes decades to produce good fruit. The Shah asked, “Do you believe this tree will be of any benefit to you, old man? You will die before it bears fruit.” The old man replied, “Those before me planted and we benefited. We should plant so that others after us might benefit.” The Shah was impressed with the old man’s concern for the future generations, and then rewarded the old man with money. The old man then said to the Shah, “You see! The tree has brought me benefit already!” The Shah smiled and rewarded him again.

There is a similar Arab proverb that states, “Before us they planted, and now we eat what they have planted. We must too plant, so that those after us will likewise eat.”

Do whatever you can in this world to benefit others, and the rewards will be endless in the next.

Multiculturalism and Islam

'The Companions of the Prophet, God bless and grant him peace, were almost all converts, and not all of them were Arab. Salman was Aryan (now called Iranian), Bilal was black, and Suhaib was an Arab raised among the Byzantines. Our Prophet ﷺ also dressed in a variety of styles; he wore Ethiopian shirts, Yemeni cloaks, Arabian lungis, and Byzantine garments. The Prophet ﷺ was already practicing global culture in the seventh century, knowing that his religion would be embraced by many cultures, just as he predicted.'

'What is the purpose of Ramadan

It is about reconnecting with your Lord, it’s about re-establishing that bond with Allah, the rope that Allah has given us which is the Quran. When Allah says, “Hold fast to the rope of Allah.” The Prophet (saw) said the Quran is the unbreakable rope of Allah, that is the Quran.

Part of the covenant with Allah during Ramadan is to return to the book of Allah and to discipline ourselves to reading and reflect on its meaning. “Don’t they deeply ponder over this Quran or are their hearts sealed.” This is the time to go back to the Quran, to reflect on the Quran, this is a time to do a reckoning with the self. Where have we been in the past year and what do we plan to do in the coming years.

If Allah gives us life, it is recommitting ourselves to the sacred path and to this tradition. This is the way of Abraham, this is the way of Moses, this is the way of John of the Baptist, the way of Jesus and this is the way of Muhammad (Peace be upon all of them.) This is the prophetic way, we are walking in the paths of Prophets, this is well-trodden oath, and this is the path of those closest to God. So when we are fasting, we are sharing and partaking in a discipline that every seeker of God in the past of any prophetic tradition has done. So we are connecting ourselves to a unbroken chain of tradition in connecting ourselves in a deep and sacred bond with every seeker of God from the beginning of time to the end of time, that we are connected with them in this sacred search and allow ourselves to be rescued by Allah and that is why it is a blessed month for people to take most benefit as they can.

It’s a time to shutdown the chatterbox, to let the tongue do the Dhikr of Allah instead of remembering others with wrongs, instead of speaking ill of people, instead of wasting time in empty chatter, it is a time of disciplining the tongue, it is a time of disciplining the heart. Imam Al Ghazali says, “the real fasting is not the fasting of the tongue and stomach but the real fasting is the fasting of the heart.” Where you prevent your hear from feasting on prohibited thoughts and concerns like doubt, fear, anxiety of provisions (anxiety about provisions is not trusting in Allah) so it’s letting go of the fear. One of the thing about the modern world, it is a fear based world, there is all these demons in the world trying to scare people. Scare them about their provisions scare them about this and that, you could lose your job, and you could lose your wealth. Indeed you could lose it all, but if you have Allah you haven’t lost anything because just as the poet said “everything you desire exists with Allah so seek Allah and you will get everything you desire.” So all this fear and this worry, Ramadan is time to give all that up. It is to let go. That is the message we have to take out to this world, if you look at state of the world and the state of human beings right now, human beings are in a very serious condition, that the number one industry in this planet is intoxicants and the number two industry in this planet is armaments keeping people in a state of stupor and giving them the means by which they can destroy themselves. Fasting, this is how we break free from all this madness disciplining ourselves and refusing ourselves to react in the reactionary mode, entering in to the obsessing compulsive demands of the self and say I trust in Allah.

So my advice to myself and all the brothers and sisters is to take this opportunity to use Ramadan and make it a time of prayer, a time of peace, a time of recitation of the Quran and reflection of the Quran. Fast from all this madness, don’t look at the advertisements. It is not just food and drink; it is about fasting from all those things that make you heedless of Allah.’

"There are people who would want to keep you asleep. If they don’t use the drug of white powder, they’ll use the drug of television, they’ll use the drug of mass media, they’ll use all these drugs but they’re going to keep you asleep because they fear the day that you wake up. That’s what they fear and you should be very well aware of that because Allah SWT told us in the Quran - all these political tyrants, all these multinational political, economic powers are literally subjugating, humiliating, stealing the resources of Muslims and human beings all over the world in order for them to play Golf on the weekends - and then you have these powerful military that go around terrorizing and humiliating people, bombing innocent civilians, gassing human beings! Be aware of that people! Kurdish human beings living in villages - mothers with their babies gassed by these people. This is how they feel about human beings.Those gas bombs weren’t made in those countries. They’re made by the same people that bring ‘good’ things to life and this is not a joke. This is reality people, this is reality. And if you don’t like it, go back to sleep."

Hamza Yusuf

Was listening to a lecture and stumbled across this golden statement by the great 14th century Moroccan Islamic scholar named Sidi Ahmed Zarouqh (Rahimullah) so I had to write it down.

"Know, May Allah give you and I success and rectify our wordly and other wordly lives and grant us adherence to the way of the truth in our journeys but repentance is a key and Taqwa is vast and uprightness is the source of rectification. Furthermore a servant is never free from blunders and shortcomings or lassitude, therefore never be neglectful of Towbah and never turn away from the act of returning to Allah and never neglect acts that take you closer to Allah.

Indeed, every time one of these three occurs, repent and return. Every time you make a mistake listen and obey. Every time you display shortcomings or show lack of enthusiasm don’t desist on your efforts, let your main concern be to remove from your outer state anything that is displeasing and then maintain its outward state through continuous council and continue doing this until you find that you’re fleeing from anything outwardly displeasing as your second nature and your avoidance of your boundaries of prohibited things is as it acts as a protective net that is placed before you. At this point it is time to turn inward towards your hearts presence and to its reality with both reflection and remembrance.

Don’t hasten the end result before you’ve completed the beginning and likewise don’t begin without looking towards the end result. This is so because the one who seeks the outset at the end loses providential care and the one who seeks the end at the outset loses providential guidance.

Act in accordance to principles and the appropriate legal rulings and not in accordance with stories and fantasies, don’t even consider stories of how things went with others except as a tonic to strengthen your result. Certainly not as a reference based upon their outward forms or that they seem to be telling us. In all of this depend on a clear path you can refer to and a foundation you can depend upon on all of your states. The best of these is the path of Ibn A’atailah given that in it is a clear direction to Allah.

Do not take from others words unless it is in accordance with your own path but submit to their implications if you desire and do not add vain and foul speech to it. Put aside anything you cannot take its benefit immidiently. Beware of being extremely hard on yourself before you have obtained a mastery over it. But also beware of being to lacks with it in anything that concerns sacred rulings. It is constantly fleeing from moderation in everything and it inclines towards extremisms in both matters of deviancy and guidance. To repeat, this is so because it is constantly fleeing from moderation in everthing and it inclines towards extremism in both matters of deviancy and guidance.

Seek out a companion to help you out in your affairs and take his council in your inward and outward affairs, if you do indeed take his companionship then treat him in a manner that is benefiting to his state and give him your council based on his inabilities and abilities because the perfective friend is no longer to be found.”

Was Mohammad Salman Hamdan purposely forgotten?  

Mohammad Salman Hamdani was a Muslim American who died at the World Trade Center attacks, when he went there to offer rescue assistance.

Years later however, the 23 year old isn’t remembered at Ground Zero for his bravery as a first responder and budding police cadet.

To Hamdani’s mother, the connection between her son and the building that took his life is much bigger than that. “They do not want anyone with a Muslim name to be acknowledged at ground zero with such high honours,” 
Talat Hamdani, 60, told the New York Times. “They don’t want someone with the name Mohammad to be up there.”

Was Mohammad Salman Hamdan purposely forgotten?

Mohammad Salman Hamdani was a Muslim American who died at the World Trade Center attacks, when he went there to offer rescue assistance.

Years later however, the 23 year old isn’t remembered at Ground Zero for his bravery as a first responder and budding police cadet.

To Hamdani’s mother, the connection between her son and the building that took his life is much bigger than that. “They do not want anyone with a Muslim name to be acknowledged at ground zero with such high honours,”
Talat Hamdani, 60, told the New York Times. “They don’t want someone with the name Mohammad to be up there.”

Which Muslim group is correct?

"We must stop all of this arrogance & sectarianism amongst some of the community members that we have, who only have one way of doing things. One way, there’s only one way “my way or the high way” and that’s it. No, we have a religion that is deeply nuance, it has a broad usool, there are multiple interpretations for many of the rulings of Islam and beware of arrogating to yourself the role that Allah has given to his self alone and Allah knows his religion. Most of the Ijtihadat of our great scholars were done by signing their fatwas with “Allah knows best” in other words this is the best I can but Allah knows best.

We have to stop all of this madness where somebody says “Ya akhi haram” is that agreed upon? Have you studied these books? Have you studied the usool? Because there are some things that the ulema say there’s a difference of opinion, some of the ulema differ on certain things and you’ll have this. Some of the ulema will say “the Halal is clear, the Haram is clear and between them are grey areas” many people don’t know them, only the ulema are expertise in these and we are talking about the giant ulema, not people who have studied and done their nizami course or done their graduate from 4 years ar a Islamic university, no some of the teachers studied for 30 years at the hands of their teachers and they have have life long learners, Shaykh Abdullah Ibn Bayyah studied from the time he was about 4 years old until the time he was 21 everyday, 5-6 days a week, 10-15 hours a day pure study with his father and other teachers. He memorised 10 qiraats of the Quran, he memorised all of the dawaween of the pre-Islamic Arabs, he learned all of these texts in Arabic grammar, he studied the Mukhtasar Khalil, memorised the whole Mashoor of the madhab of Imam Malik and when you see him with his piety and the way he addresses these issues “Allah knows best, this is the best I can do” and then we have people saying “who is Shaikh Abdullah Ibn Bayyah? “ Who are these intellectual dwarves who limit their way of thinking. Allah gave you the ability to expand your mind, if your mind is not expanded, you’re to blame, but knowledge come with patience”

voixmagazine:

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Throughout history, philosophers have been preoccupied with the moral rights which human beings possess. However, the rights most observed by philosophers have been natural rights and human rights.

Others distinguish no…

You have to understand the level of the person you are speaking to, there are many people who have tape recorders and they have pre-recorded messages, that they are going to deliver. It doesn’t who you are, doesn’t matter what your level of education is, this person who is a Daae will come and click and turn on the cassette that’s in his brain and then the same thing comes out. Then he wonders why he keeps receiving the same response from people.



When you are dealing with a human being, you are dealing with a very complicated creature. Each human being is bringing with him/her an entire history. They’re bringing with them their childhood, their relationships with their parents (which is the first authoritarian experience and some people have very dramatic experiences with their parents. Which leads to a response to any type of authority that they see in the world). So each one of these human beings that you see out there has an entire biography and if you don’t take that into consideration when you’re looking at a person, that this is a unique human being, that has a unique experience of the world and while as human beings we have a common experience in the world in terms of being human. We have very particular experiences that give each one of us a different perspective on the world.

You have to understand the level of the person you are speaking to, there are many people who have tape recorders and they have pre-recorded messages, that they are going to deliver. It doesn’t who you are, doesn’t matter what your level of education is, this person who is a Daae will come and click and turn on the cassette that’s in his brain and then the same thing comes out. Then he wonders why he keeps receiving the same response from people.

When you are dealing with a human being, you are dealing with a very complicated creature. Each human being is bringing with him/her an entire history. They’re bringing with them their childhood, their relationships with their parents (which is the first authoritarian experience and some people have very dramatic experiences with their parents. Which leads to a response to any type of authority that they see in the world). So each one of these human beings that you see out there has an entire biography and if you don’t take that into consideration when you’re looking at a person, that this is a unique human being, that has a unique experience of the world and while as human beings we have a common experience in the world in terms of being human. We have very particular experiences that give each one of us a different perspective on the world.

Tags: islam human peace

If we look at a traditional view of the muslim world from western scholars. You will often see the selectiveness of the information. An example: when ever they (orientalist) look at muslim narrative of how muslims view themselves, how they view their prophet, how they view their tradition. They will take those things that are flattering to the tradition and make remarks like “this is obviously a fabricated story” and not by 19th century orientalist I am talking about today. And when something is  unflattering they will transmit the narration without any critical remark. The good example is the age of his wife. This is always mentioned and its never looked critically at the differences of opinion that exist among muslim scholars about the age of Aisha. They will not look critically at the contextualisation of the age of a woman in that society and what that meant in terms of marrying older men. If you look at Washington Irvene in the 19th century he mentioned that story and he doesn’t bat an eyelid. He mentions how precocious Arabian girls were because in early 19th century America a 12 year old girl would marry and that was very common or even early and in the jewish tradition if you look at the Talmud, you will find that Rabbis actually sanctioned marriage at 7 years of age with adult males. This is in accepted rabbinical tradition. But when modern people look at these things they will highlight those things that they want to  and then they will set aside or ignore entirely those things that they don’t.

If we look at a traditional view of the muslim world from western scholars. You will often see the selectiveness of the information. An example: when ever they (orientalist) look at muslim narrative of how muslims view themselves, how they view their prophet, how they view their tradition. They will take those things that are flattering to the tradition and make remarks like “this is obviously a fabricated story” and not by 19th century orientalist I am talking about today. And when something is unflattering they will transmit the narration without any critical remark. The good example is the age of his wife. This is always mentioned and its never looked critically at the differences of opinion that exist among muslim scholars about the age of Aisha. They will not look critically at the contextualisation of the age of a woman in that society and what that meant in terms of marrying older men. If you look at Washington Irvene in the 19th century he mentioned that story and he doesn’t bat an eyelid. He mentions how precocious Arabian girls were because in early 19th century America a 12 year old girl would marry and that was very common or even early and in the jewish tradition if you look at the Talmud, you will find that Rabbis actually sanctioned marriage at 7 years of age with adult males. This is in accepted rabbinical tradition. But when modern people look at these things they will highlight those things that they want to and then they will set aside or ignore entirely those things that they don’t.

People fall into entrenched views.



What does the ‘the West’ mean, I don’t know what that means yet I use that term. Because I know when people in the streets of Cairo are shouting “down with America” or “down with the West” what do they mean by that. Do they mean down with the Florida school teacher in her 60s who flew to Baghdad to be a human shield against American bombardment. If you asked them they would say no and the same is said for those who talk about the muslim world. Like Bernard Lewis said that “they hate us” I mean have you done a poll on 1.8 billion people and asked them all how they really feel about YOU and who is the you, you are talking about

People fall into entrenched views.

What does the ‘the West’ mean, I don’t know what that means yet I use that term. Because I know when people in the streets of Cairo are shouting “down with America” or “down with the West” what do they mean by that. Do they mean down with the Florida school teacher in her 60s who flew to Baghdad to be a human shield against American bombardment. If you asked them they would say no and the same is said for those who talk about the muslim world. Like Bernard Lewis said that “they hate us” I mean have you done a poll on 1.8 billion people and asked them all how they really feel about YOU and who is the you, you are talking about

We have an obligation to every last victim of this illegal aggression, because all of this carnage has been done in our name.

Since World War II, 90 percent of the casualties of war are unarmed civilians, a third of them children. Our victims have done nothing to us. From Palestine to Afghanistan to Iraq to Somalia to wherever our next target may be, their murders are not collateral damage. They are the nature of modern warfare.

They don’t hate us because of our freedoms. They hate us because every day, we are funding and committing crimes against humanity.

The so-called war on terror is a cover for our military aggression to gain control of the resources of Western nations. This is sending the poor of this country to kill the poor of those Muslim countries. This is trading blood for oil. This is genocide, and to most of the world, we are the terrorists.

In these times, remaining silent about our responsibility to the world and its future is criminal, and in light of our complicity in the supreme crimes against humanity in Iraq and Afghanistan and ongoing violations of the UN charter and international law, how dare any American criticize the actions of legitimate resistance to illegal occupation? How dare we condemn anyone else’s violence?

Our so-called enemies in Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine and our other colonies around the world, and our inner cities here at home are struggling against the oppressive hand of empire, demanding respect for their humanity. They are labeled insurgents or terrorists for resisting rape and pillage by the white establishment, but they are our brothers and sisters in the struggle for justice.

The civilians at the other end of our weapons don’t have a choice. But American soldiers have choices, and while there may have been some doubt five years ago, today, we know the truth. Our soldiers don’t sacrifice for duty, honor and country. They sacrifice for Kellogg, Brown and Root. They don’t fight for America—they fight for their lives and their buddies beside them because we put them in a war zone.

They’re not defending our freedoms—they are laying the foundations for 14 permanent military bases to defend the freedoms of ExxonMobil and British Petroleum. They’re not establishing democracy, they’re establishing the basis for an economic occupation to continue after the military occupation has ended.

Iraqi society today, thanks to American help, is defined by house raids, death squads, checkpoints, detentions, curfews, blood in the streets and constant violence. We must dare to speak out in support of the Iraqi people, who resist and endure the horrific existence we brought upon them through our bloodthirsty imperial crusade.

We must dare to speak out in support of the American war resisters—the real military heroes, who uphold their oath to defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, including those terrorist cells in Washington, D.C., more commonly known as the legislative, executive and judicial branches.

I close with a quote from Frederick Douglass, but if you want more information, please visit my Web site at liberatethis.com.

Frederick Douglass said: “Those who profess to favor freedom and yet deprecate agitation are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its mighty waters.

"The struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, and it may be both moral and physical, but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will."

Every one of us must keep demanding, keep fighting, keep thundering, keep plowing, keep speaking and keep struggling until justice is served. No justice, no peace.

We have an obligation to every last victim of this illegal aggression, because all of this carnage has been done in our name.

Since World War II, 90 percent of the casualties of war are unarmed civilians, a third of them children. Our victims have done nothing to us. From Palestine to Afghanistan to Iraq to Somalia to wherever our next target may be, their murders are not collateral damage. They are the nature of modern warfare.

They don’t hate us because of our freedoms. They hate us because every day, we are funding and committing crimes against humanity.

The so-called war on terror is a cover for our military aggression to gain control of the resources of Western nations. This is sending the poor of this country to kill the poor of those Muslim countries. This is trading blood for oil. This is genocide, and to most of the world, we are the terrorists.

In these times, remaining silent about our responsibility to the world and its future is criminal, and in light of our complicity in the supreme crimes against humanity in Iraq and Afghanistan and ongoing violations of the UN charter and international law, how dare any American criticize the actions of legitimate resistance to illegal occupation? How dare we condemn anyone else’s violence?

Our so-called enemies in Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine and our other colonies around the world, and our inner cities here at home are struggling against the oppressive hand of empire, demanding respect for their humanity. They are labeled insurgents or terrorists for resisting rape and pillage by the white establishment, but they are our brothers and sisters in the struggle for justice.

The civilians at the other end of our weapons don’t have a choice. But American soldiers have choices, and while there may have been some doubt five years ago, today, we know the truth. Our soldiers don’t sacrifice for duty, honor and country. They sacrifice for Kellogg, Brown and Root. They don’t fight for America—they fight for their lives and their buddies beside them because we put them in a war zone.

They’re not defending our freedoms—they are laying the foundations for 14 permanent military bases to defend the freedoms of ExxonMobil and British Petroleum. They’re not establishing democracy, they’re establishing the basis for an economic occupation to continue after the military occupation has ended.

Iraqi society today, thanks to American help, is defined by house raids, death squads, checkpoints, detentions, curfews, blood in the streets and constant violence. We must dare to speak out in support of the Iraqi people, who resist and endure the horrific existence we brought upon them through our bloodthirsty imperial crusade.

We must dare to speak out in support of the American war resisters—the real military heroes, who uphold their oath to defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, including those terrorist cells in Washington, D.C., more commonly known as the legislative, executive and judicial branches.

I close with a quote from Frederick Douglass, but if you want more information, please visit my Web site at liberatethis.com.

Frederick Douglass said: “Those who profess to favor freedom and yet deprecate agitation are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its mighty waters.

"The struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, and it may be both moral and physical, but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will."

Every one of us must keep demanding, keep fighting, keep thundering, keep plowing, keep speaking and keep struggling until justice is served. No justice, no peace.

Elements of Success By Shaykh Hamza Yusuf

The essence of failure is summed up in the Qur’an as:

- Disobeying Allah subhaanahu wa ta’ala,
- Disobeying His Messenger sallallahu `alaihi wa sallam, and,
- Disputation amongst each other.

For our current situation to be reversed, there are many methods, and ways to go
about things. Obviously holding firmly to the Qur’an and the Sunnah is the
first. But, there are elements that we need to implement in our lives that will
bring to life the Islam that was lived not so long ago by our predecessors,
InshaAllah.

Ten Qualities That Lead to Success

1. Every successful person has a strong sense of purpose. What greater sense of
purpose than to know that your goal is Allah subhaanahu wa ta’ala.

2. Seek out role models or mentors. These mentors instill in them a sense of
possibility. What better role model than Rasulullah sallallahu ‘alaihi wa
sallam?

3. Strength of visualizing the goal. Rasulullah sallallahu `alaihi wa sallam had
the strongest visualization of any human. We are people of `success’ and this
Deen is not a Religion of `failure’, but a Religion of SUCCESS!

Michael Hart, the historian who wrote the 100 most influencial personalities in
history, placed Muhammad sallallahu `alaihi wa sallam as number 1.

The greatest witness is what your own enemies show witness to. Our example is
the best example, for verily Rasulullah sallallahu `alaihi wa sallam was
`Uswatun Hasanah’, the Best example; he is the model and mentor of success for
all of mankind.

4. Positive sensory orientation. That you dwell on your successes, not dwelling
on your failures. Remember your past successes when you were weak, and Allah
subhaanahu wa ta’ala will give you victory, look at Badr.

5. Self assurance. They know that they can succeed. `La tahinuu, wa laa tahzanuu
wa antum la’nawla in kuntum mu’mineen’ � `Do not be weak, and do not grieve,
and you are the uppermost, if you are Believers’.

Our afflictions are expiations for us. Remember at `Uhud, Rasulullah sallallahu
`alaihi wa sallam said: `Your dead are in the Hell fire, our dead are in
Jannah’.

6. They plan and organize. They know how to prioritize. Look at the most
important things and take that. We have people now that argue over where you
put your hands in the prayer, where your feet should be, etc.

These things are known in the books of Fiqh, we don’t need to argue over them.
You ask any scholar of any worth and they tell you very clearly. There’s
different ways to do it, because we’re not supposed to get caught up in the
trivial matters, because this is the Talmudic (Jewish) mind that asks `what
kind of cow, what color cow’ etc. All triviality.

Even in the West, they say that the `devil’s in the details’ (proverb). What’s
important is to ask `where’s your heart?’ Where is your heart in the Salaat?
People watching others pray during Salaat, finding mistakes with the Imaam etc.
Where is our heart in the Salaat?

We plan to corrupt each other, organizations are successful, because they plan
and organize each other. We are good planners when it comes to Walimah’s. For
instance, how many sheep will we have, how many belly dancers etc. Allahu
Akbar, Takbeer, what type of takbeer? Takbeer of Salatul Janaazah, 4 of them!

7. The ability to acquire the necessary skills to succeed. We need to produce
male and female scholars. Why don’t we want to be from those people? The people
of knowledge? Make your children people of Akhirah, not Dunya!

8. Patience. Be patient and enjoin others to patience. We have two lessons that
Muslims have to learn, most of our tribulations are coming from: o Kibr, and, o
Lack of patience.

Saying La ilaha Illallah does not make us special, because a Munafiq says La
ilaha illallah, and yet they are lower than the Kaafir.

And remember that if you feel safe from Nifaaq, then according to Hasan al Basri
rahimahullah, you are a Munafiq! The only one who feels safe from nifaaq is the
munafiq.

`Umar ibn Khattaab radi’Allahu anhu went to Huthaifah ibn Yaman and asked him
`Do you see in me what you see in them? Tell me by Allah, I want to know if
`Umar is a Munafiq?’ Huthaifah radi’Allahu anhu replied, `I don’t see in you
what I see in them’.

The qualities of a Munafiq (some of them include):

- They oscillate
- They remember Allah subhaanahu wa ta’ala little,
- They say on their tongues what’s not in their hearts,
- They pray lazily, etc and so forth.

9. Perseverance. Be persevering. No one will have except that what he endeavors
for’.

10. To love what one is doing. Radi’Allahu `anhum wa Radu `anh’ � `They love
Allah, and Allah is pleased with them’.

Loving Allah subhaanahu wa ta’ala and His Messenger! Spending what we love and
giving from it freely. You don’t reach righteousness (Birr) until you give out
that which you love.

"When perfection is reached then it has to diminish, So once something is called
perfect, expect it to perish.”